Tailbone Book, Chapter 3, STIGMA and Psychology of Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain

Tailbone Book, Chapter 3,  STIGMA and PSYCHOLOGY of Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain
The actual VIDEO is at the bottom of this page.
Here is the TEXT from the video:
  • Hi. I’m Dr. Patrick Foye, M.D., Director of the Coccyx Pain Center or Tailbone Pain Center here in New Jersey, United States, online at www.TailboneDoctor.com.
  • This is the next in a series of videos just going chapter by chapter and giving you a glimpse of the information within the different chapters in my book “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!”
  • In this video, we’ll cover briefly some of the information in Chapter number three, which is overcoming stigma and talking about the psychology of tailbone pain.
  • And the general point for this chapter is that unfortunately coccydynia, or coccyx pain, tailbone pain, is for some reason considered a taboo topic that a lot of people don’t want to talk about.
  • Or they don’t mention it, or they feel embarrassed about it.
  • So unlike if somebody injured their shoulder or their knee or their low back (in the lumbar spine up near the belt line)…
  • Lots of people would feel comfortable telling their friends family co-worker, “Hey, I injured my shoulder… or my knee… or what have you…”
  • But for the tailbone or coccyx, it’s an area that people feel less comfortable sometimes talking about.
  • And there’s a certain amount of stigma just because it’s a very private area.
  • It’s an area that people don’t talk about in public… over a public dinner you wouldn’t hear most people talking about their coccyx or tailbone.
  • And that’s unfortunate because lots of people suffer with pain without knowing that that’s their problem because they don’t get the feedback and discussion from other people the way they would if it was a problem at their shoulder or their knee.
  • And, also, they may not discuss it with their physician.
  • Their physician may not know the pain that they’re suffering with
  • Or the physician may not ask the appropriate questions to find out that the pain is down at the tailbone and not at the lower back lumbar area (up near the belt line, which is more common).
  • So, doctors will assume that that’s where your pain is as well.
  • There’s a there’s a section in here that says sort of “What’s funny about tailbone pain?” which is just kind of making the point that… to a late-night talk-show comedian if a politician or celebrity injured their coccyx it would seem like something funny to joke about.
  • But for people that are suffering with tailbone pain it’s obviously not funny at all.
  • It actually can be a severe source of pain and suffering and can really be life-altering in a in a very negative way.
  • So, there is a section here that talks about depression and anxiety in patients with coccyx pain.
  • True for patients with chronic pain in general: when you live your life day-to-day having pain multiple times a day or throughout the day, day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year… it can be depressing and it can cause anxiety.
  • And people can have their life start to revolve around the pain syndrome… and where can I sit without pain… and do I have my cushion with me… and can I go to that family social event when it’s a significant drive from here and the pain and the drive or the commute is painful and sitting for the event will be painful.
  • So all of those things really become important.
  • And it becomes important that when talking with or evaluating patients with tailbone pain that of course we do that with compassion and understanding and try to really appreciate that although the tailbone itself is a very very small bone (or series of bones, down at the lower tip of the of spine) the coccyx really can cause very severe pain and suffering and disability.
  • So that’s certainly something to keep in mind.
  • Tailbone pain itself can be can be certainly very frustrating for patients.
  • And it’s important that not only their doctors be aware of that but that their family members be aware of that and appreciate that as well.
  • By the way, as far as the doctors… there is a section here about bias from doctors and I can tell you even as a physician running at Coccyx Pain Center… I can tell you there’s bias from doctors who say, “Really, why would you want to keep treat those kinds of patients?” and really dismissive and non-compassionate comments that that are unfortunately all too common within the medical community.
  • So really what you want to do is you want to find a doctor who will listen to you, who is understanding, who will take your symptoms seriously, so that they can do the appropriate diagnostic testing and the appropriate workup for you.
  • There are lots of doctors who have told their patients, “Oh, well, tailbone pain… tailbone pain is not really a problem, or it’s not that serious. It’s just a little bone. Or maybe it’s all in your head.” or those kinds of dismissive comments that they typically would not make if you were having pain in your thumb, or your shoulder, or your knee, etc.
  • So that becomes important to find a health care professional that works with you.
  • So that’s kind of just a general glimpse of some of the things within Chapter 3 of the book.
  • For a full copy of the book, the easiest way to get that is to go to www.TailboneBook.com
  • And you can get a copy of the book.
  • There will have all the links to the appropriate pages depending what country you’re in… whether it’s through Amazon, whether it’s the printed paperback copy of the book which is 272 pages or to get the electronic copy of the book.
  • The e-book you can access from anywhere worldwide.
  • You can get that and read it. You do not need a special ebook reading device or anything like that.
  • So, again, go to www.TailboneBook.com
  • To find me online, or to come for evaluation here, you can certainly find me at www.TailboneDoctor.com
  • And post your comments down below, regarding this topic: about stigma and the psychology of tailbone pain, or comments that you may have had from doctors or friends or family.
  • I think that that would be important for others to read and chime in on as well.
  • Because it’s very very common that people have those kinds of stories, unfortunately.
  • So, anyway, that’s Chapter Three from the book.
  • I hope that’s helpful for you.
  • Post your comments down below.
  • Bye, bye.
 Here is the actual VIDEO:

Here is the screenshot thumbnail image for the video:
Chapter 3 of Tailbone Pain Book: Stigma, Psychology, Emotional Stress, Depression, Anxiety, associated with  Coccyx Pain. Tailbone Pain

Chapter 3 of Tailbone Pain Book: Stigma, Psychology, Emotional Stress, Depression, Anxiety, associated with Coccyx Pain. Tailbone Pain

Tailbone Book, Chapter 2, Symptoms of Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain

Tailbone Book, Chapter 2, Symptoms of Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain
  • This is the next in a series of videos that give a glimpse into the chapters of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!”
The actual VIDEO is at the bottom of this page.
Here is the TEXT from the video:
  • Hi. I’m Dr. Patrick Foye M.D.
  • I’m the Director of the Coccyx Pain Center or Tailbone Pain Center here in New Jersey, United States, online at www.TailboneDoctor.com.
  • And this is the next in a series of videos just going chapter by chapter to provide a glimpse at the content in my book “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!”
  • And in this video we’ll look at chapter 2 which is “Symptoms of Tailbone Pain” or coccyx pain.
  • And the idea here is that there’s lots of people who have coccyx pain, or tailbone pain, coccydynia, that don’t actually know that that’s what’s causing their pain.
  • People are not familiar with the anatomy.
  • Unfortunately lots of doctors are not familiar with the anatomy.
  • So people go on suffering and they know that something is painful when they’re sitting, when they’re sitting leaning back, when they go sometimes from sit to stand.
  • There’s a whole variety of symptoms that are common.
  • But unless they have a doctor that actually examines them properly, or takes a good history, or unless the patient themself is familiar with the anatomy, they often may not realize that the pain is coming from their tailbone.
  • The tailbone is located… here’s the spine… this part is the sacrum…
  • The tailbone or coccyx is located right down here at the lower tip of the spine, below the sacrum and just above the anus.
  • So the patients typically will have pain in that location, as shown in the illustration here.
  • And again that pain will be worse when they’re sitting, and for some people with sit-to-stand transitions as well.
  • So really that pain while sitting is a classic, classic, classic symptom of tailbone pain or coccydynia.
  • So that should be a big clue.
  • Pain down at that lower tip of the spine.
  • Sitting leaning forwards or sitting leaning towards one side or to the other side that will often have the pain feel a little bit better, because it’s taking some of the pressure off of the coccyx while you do that.
  • And that can be another classic finding with patients with that tailbone pain.
  • You can have tailbone pain that travels to other body regions as well, but that’s far less common.
  • Usually it stays relatively well localized you know at the coccyx or at least in the immediate area there abouts.
  • So that’s a little bit of a glimpse of what’s in Chapter 2 within the book “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!”
  • For more information you can find me online at www.TailboneDoctor.com
  • Or if you’re interested in getting a copy of the book, either the paperback copy or an e-book copy…
  • The e-book copy you can get worldwide.
  • The paperback copy you can get worldwide through international shipping, or you can have it printed directly within United States, Canada, the UK, Europe, etc. (and more countries are growing onto that list)…
  • The best way to find the book online is just to go to www.TailboneBook.com.
  • And on there I will keep all the links for the Amazon pages for the different countries, and such, so you can find the site that works best for you through t At one, at www.TailboneBook.com.
  • Anyway I hope that’s helpful.
  • Definitely post your questions or comments down below about symptoms of tailbone pain, related to this chapter.
  • And I’ll try to keep up on those answering your questions or comments if you post them down below this video.
  • Alright, bye-bye now.
Here is the actual VIDEO:

Here is the screenshot thumbnail image for the video:
Chapter 2 of Tailbone Pain Book, SYMPTOMS of Coccyx Pain

Chapter 2 of Tailbone Pain Book, SYMPTOMS of Coccyx Pain

 

 

Tailbone Book, Chapter 1, Introduction to Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain

Tailbone Book, Chapter 1, Introduction to Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain
  • This is the first in a series of videos that give a glimpse into the chapters of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!”
The actual VIDEO is at the bottom of this page.
Here is the TEXT from the video:
  • Hi. I’m Dr. Patrick Foye, M.D., the Director of the Coccyx Pain Center. or Tailbone Pain Center. here in New Jersey. in the United States. online at www.TailboneDoctor.com.
  • And this is the first in a series of videos going chapter by chapter, and reviewing the content in my book Tailbone Pain Relief Now!
  • The idea of these videos is that some people prefer to learn in a video format watching the videos rather than reading the book. Or, if you’re international, in some countries you may have a tougher time for international shipping to get a hard copy of the book.
  • Although any place worldwide with internet access you can get the e-book online and I’ll post the links below for where to get that.
  • The easiest way is just to go to www.TailboneBook.com
  • Anyway, so I’m starting with Chapter 1.
  • And we’ll just do a few minutes from each chapter just to kind of give you a sense of the material that’s covered.
  • So here we are in Chapter 1, which is the Introduction.
  • The first question was: who is the book for and why did I write the book?
  • And basically the book is for people who have tailbone pain.
  • I have been a medical school faculty member for 20-some years now and most of the things that I initially published were published in medical journals for physicians, for other physicians or doctors that are treating musculoskeletal pain syndromes.
  • And what I realized was that a lot of the information really was not getting out to the physicians.
  • There are so many journals and so many textbooks and places I was publishing, but there’s a gazillion more journals and textbooks that physicians try to keep up on.
  • And it’s impossible for any doctor to read them all and to stay current on the current evaluation and treatment for coccyx pain, tailbone pain, coccydynia, or for any other condition for that matter.
  • So really it was a matter of publishing directly for patients.
  • So this book is written as much as possible in laypersons language, so that you do not need to be a physician in order to read it, to understand it.
  • This is not written primarily for physicians at all.
  • I do think physicians could learn a lot from reading it, but it’s not written for doctors.
  • It’s written for people that are suffering for the tailbone pain.
  • So the goal was to basically empower patients, empower people to have the information that they need.
  • So especially for people that may be at a great distance, overseas and other places that are not able to come and see me directly in person.
  • Through this book, I can sort of put the information in your hands.
  • Knowledge is power. And with that knowledge you can help yourself to navigate the medical system in order to get the appropriate diagnostic testing and the appropriate treatment options to help with your pain.
  • So that’s who the book is for: it is for people with tailbone pain.
  • And basically the goal is then to put the information right into your hands.
  • The illustration in this chapter is basically showing the location for tailbone pain, which you can see right here.
  • We’re going to talk about that more in another chapter.
  • But it’s basically at the lower tip of the spine just below the sacrum a little bit higher than the anus.
  • That’s where the location is for people that are having tailbone pain.
  • The format that the book is going to follow is basically that each chapter will begin with sort of a small patient story, summarizing in a few sentences a patient who came to see me and what the issues were and how that relates to that particular chapter.
  • So when we get to chapters on fractures, or dislocations, or cancer, etc., there’ll be a short story. It’s just a single paragraph to explain a little bit about that, just to give you sort of a perspective for being able to see yourself in those situations, if that’s a scenario that sounds familiar for you or that applies to you. And then the chapter will then go through the educational contents and all of that.
  • The legal disclaimer is that the book and of itself is medical information. It’s education.
  • It is NOT a replacement for seeing a physician in person and having an in-person evaluation by a doctor that is experienced at treating tailbone pain.
  • The book really provides a lot of information for you.
  • The whole thing is 272 pages, so there’s lots of info in here, more than certainly 99.9% of physicians know about the coccyx is in this book.
  • So certainly you can you can learn a lot of information here.
  • But the book itself is not a replacement for actually being evaluated and treated by a physician.
  • The book is not individual medical advice for any one specific person.
  • It’s really a starting point so that you can then discuss these topics with your treating physicians.
  • So anyway so that’s Chapter 1, which is probably the shortest one, which is really “who’s the book for?” (people with tailbone pain) and “why did I write it?” (because everything else that I was publishing for medical doctors and in medical journals and textbooks really wasn’t getting through well enough so as a believer in empowering patients it’s a matter of giving you the information right to the source which is you).
  • So, anyway, I hope that’s helpful.
  • I will be doing more of these, reviewing subsequent chapters in the book and we’ll go from there.
  • You can find me online at www.TailboneDoctor.com
Here is the actual VIDEO:

 

Here is the screenshot thumbnail image for the video
Chapter 1 of Tailbone Pain Book, INTRO to Coccyx Pain

Chapter 1 of Tailbone Pain Book, INTRO to Coccyx Pain

 

2nd Coccyx Pain Symposium, 2018, Netherlands

The 1st Coccyx Pain Symposium in Paris, France, in 2016 was Great!
Coming soon: The 2nd Coccyx Pain Symposium, June 2018, in the Netherlands…
  • 2nd Coccyx Pain Symposium, June 2018, Netherlands

    2nd Coccyx Pain Symposium, June 2018, Netherlands

  •  Dates: June 29 – 30,  2018
  • Location: Dordrechts Museum, Dordrecht, NL
  • More Information will be available soon on the following website: https://coccyxsymposium2018.com/

 

Going from 2017 to 2018: Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain, Coccydynia

Happy New Year 2018!

Let’s Review 2017 and Plan for 2018, regarding educating others about Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain
Here is the TEXT from the Video. (The actual video itself is down at the bottom of this page.)
  • Hi. I’m Dr. Patrick Foye.
  • I’m an M.D. or medical doctor and I am the Director of the Coccyx Pain Center or here in New Jersey in the United States. I’m online at www.TailboneDoctor.com.
  • And this is a short video about the end of the year for 2017 and start of the year for 2018.
  • So just looking back in 2017. It’s been a great year connecting with people around the country and around the world online between Facebook and YouTube videos and such.
  • It’s really been terrific being able to connect with so many of you and hopefully provide helpful information.
  • In 2017 I did 24 videos on my YouTube channel, mostly all related to the coccyx, which is more videos in that year that I did in the previous nine years of making videos on YouTube.
  • Also, on my blog posts of online articles that I’ve written about tailbone pain, there’s more than 40 of those, I believe, in 2017.
  • Those you can find online at www.TailboneDoctor.com and then just click the tab for the blogs.
  • And I’m always looking for more ideas, so definitely post down below if you’ve found the video format to be helpful, or the blog post format to be helpful, or if you have comments, or questions about topics that you think would be helpful for me to cover.
  • I don’t do online specific medical advice for individuals, but I offer educational content and topics.
  • So if you’re having a tough time understanding, well… what’s the difference between MRI and CT scan… or what type of x-ray is best… or how do you know if there’s an infection at the tailbone… or a cyst… or cancer.
  • Whatever your questions may be. If something’s not clear from videos and blog posts that I’ve already done or from my book on tailbone pain (Tailbone Pain Relief Now!) or if you don’t have access to the book [there are people around the world in different countries… I know the print copy you can get certainly in the United States and Canada and United Kingdom and Europe. But I know in a lot of other countries you would have to mail you would have to pay the International shipping.
  • There’s an eBook version electronic book version through Amazon, which you can get worldwide any place that you have internet access. You do not need a Kindle to read it.
  • But even so, I know there’s a lot of people who just prefer learning in a video fashion, rather than reading a full 272 page book.
  • And the videos also allow us to interact more because you can put comments down below the videos and then I can respond to those and maybe make a follow-up video, or even just a reply.
  • So, the general idea then is: I’m going to try to do more of these through 2018.
  • I’m definitely interested in your feedback as to what format works well for you, what topics you’d like covered, so that I can provide information that’s helpful for you.
  • One idea that I had would be basically going through the book almost a chapter by chapter and just providing a summary of what is in each chapter because that’ll sort of lead through all the different causes of tailbone pain, the different treatment options and that may be one format to go through.
  • I will not read the entire book out loud because it’s 272 pages and more than 50 thousand words, so we would be here for a long long time and I’d have a very sore throat.
  • But in short bits it may be helpful to just summarize parts of it as we go through.
  • So those are some of my thoughts for 2018.
  • Definitely post your comments down below and give me your thoughts or feedback or ideas for what you would like to see covered as far as educational content related to coccyx pain, tailbone pain, coccydynia, coccygectomy, all of those types of things.
  • So you can post your comments down below if you’re looking for more information.
  • Meanwhile you can find me online at www.TailboneDoctor.com
  • Or if you are looking for a copy of the book, either the paperback copy or the e-book copy, the easiest way to find the links to that if you just go to www.TailbonePainBook.com and it will give you the links to go exactly to the Amazon pages or whatever that matches for your country, so you can get that there.
  • So, I hope that’s helpful.
  • Post your comments down below
  • I look forward to hearing from you and I wish you all the best for a happy and healthy 2018.
  • All right, bye-bye now.
Here is the VIDEO:

Here is a photo screenshot:
Dr. Patrick Foye, MD, discusses 2017 & 2018, regarding educational videos/articles about coccyx pain, tailbone pain, coccydynia

Dr. Patrick Foye, MD, discusses 2017 & 2018, regarding educational videos/articles about coccyx pain, tailbone pain, coccydynia

Tailbone Pain Book:

To get your copy of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!” click on this link: www.TailbonePainBook.com

Tailbone Pain Book cover Foye

Book: “Tailbone Pain Relief Now! Causes and Treatments for Your Sore or Injured Coccyx” by Patrick Foye, M.D.

Best Coccyx X-ray Views: Side-View versus Front-View for Tailbone Pain

Which Xray Views are Best for Evaluating Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain?
  • I recently did a video explaining which views are best when doing x-rays (radiographs) for coccyx pain (tailbone pain).
  • Here is the text from that video, and the actual video itself is down below.
  • (The actual video is at the bottom of this page.)
  • Hi. I’m Dr. Patrick Foye.
  • I’m an M.D., or Medical Doctor, and I am the Director of the Coccyx Pain Center or a Tailbone Pain Center here in the United States, online at www.TailboneDoctor.com.
  • And here I’m going to explain the difference for x-rays of the front view and the side view and why that’s important if you have tailbone pain.
  • So just to sort of orient you… For starters here this is a plastic model of the pelvis and  this is looking at the pelvis from the front.
  • Here you’re looking at it from the side.
  • And now you’re looking at it from the back.
  • And the tailbone is right down here.
  • And the larger bone above that is the sacrum and the easiest way to show this is without showing the entire pelvis, but just showing here the sacrum and then down below that is the coccyx or tailbone.
  • So now you’re looking from the back and this is from the side and that’s from the front.
  • So I’m going to draw these here just to give you a sense of what you’re looking at when you look at the sacrum and coccyx.
  • So the sacrum (and I’m no great artist) but the sacrum is sort of like that and then the tailbone is down below it.
  • The sacrum has five segments (one two three four five) and the sacrum is essentially fused together into one solid bone.
  • And then the tailbone is more variable.
  • It’s much smaller than the sacrum as you can see  here.
  • The **TAILBONE** is much smaller and it’s usually anywhere from three to five bones they may or may not be fused.
  • Now if you look at it  so that’s basically looking at it sort of from the front  we’re back in that particular plane.
  • How about if we look at it from the side well that’ll look something a little more like this: it has a curve to it and it’s bigger at the top and gets more narrow down at the bottom.
  • And then we’ll draw coccyx down here  roughly continuing that  curve.
  • I’m going to move this camera because there may be a little glare there okay.
  • (I think it made it worse!) Alright, there we go.
  • Alright, so basically that and again the sacrum (with its  five segments) and the tailbone  (with anywhere from three to five segments).
  • Again the tailbone being much smaller.
  • So how is this relevant when it comes to getting the proper x-rays?
  • Well, if you get x-rays that are done in the in the “front” view…
  • So basically in medicine they call that a “frontal” view, or they may call it an “A-P” view for “Anterior to Posterior”.
  • Then there’s some things that can come in the way of getting a good view of the tailbone.
  • So let’s take a look at those.
  • So basically if we look at our front view here, well in that view because we’re  taking the x-ray like this, number one you can see here how the pubic bones up in the front of the pelvis can block the view of the coccyx.
  • So right now from your vantage point of the camera or your eye you can’t see the tailbone at all.
  • So, the first thing that the radiology technician needs to do is to tilt the camera angle so that now you can see the coccyx back here whereas without that tilt if they do a straight AP view or front view they can see most or all of the sacrum but would not be able to see the coccyx.
  • So that tilt becomes very important.
  • Even if they do the tilt, there’s still problems with the front view and I’ll show you that here.
  • Well, what’s up in the front of the pelvis that’s going to be in front of the coccyx? Well, there’s the urinary bladder (the bladder where we collect urine before we  pee).
  • So that’s going to be up here and you’ve got some urine in there so that’s going to sort of block the view.
  • The other thing that’s in front of the tailbone is the uterus in women and in men and women there’s the rectum or colon (the part of the large intestine where stool collects, feces collects before having a bowel movement).
  • So basically now you’ve got your stool collecting in that area and now you can see why you’re going to have a tough time on that front view really getting any decent detail in your imaging of the coccyx.
  • So now let’s take a look…
  • [I’m going to change this camera angle to avoid the glare a little bit] So now let’s take a look from our side view.
  • Well on our side view (which is  over here this is behind you and this is in inside of your pelvis)…
  • Well the bladder would be all the way up front of you here and then your colon would be here with its stool and you can see now with that unlike the view here from the FRONT where it’s BLOCKING the view of the tailbone, here at the view from the SIDE this is NOT blocking the view of the tailbone.
  • The tailbone is still nice and clear.
  • So I would say probably 99 times out of 100 (maybe more) the SIDE view is going to be much more helpful and much more important when it comes to showing the coccyx.
  • So again this is our front view, where in medicine we call that a frontal view some which is sometimes referred to as a AP view which stands for anterior to posterior view.
  • So that’s there.
  • As opposed to over here where we have our side view, which in medicine, medically we call that a “lateral” view.
  • Now this is different  now I’m talking about x-rays.
  • It’s different if we are looking at MRIs and CT scans because those take images and slices.
  • There are some corollaries for those but I’ll probably go into that in another video because it’ll just get too long to say it all on this one.
  • So the take-home message really is that unfortunately there’s lots and lots of times where people have tailbone pain and the only view that they order in the emergency room or when they see their primary care doc or even their musculoskeletal doctor (if the doctor is not experienced in treating tailbone pain) is that they’ll get this  front view which doesn’t really show the tailbone very well at all, either because they didn’t tilt to have the tailbone included so then it’s blocked, or they did the tilt but even so you’re looking through the bladder or the uterus the stool within the colon or rectum all of that and you really can’t see the tailbone very well.
  • And then unfortunately people are told we didn’t see anything abnormal so your tailbone must be fine, which is sort of misleading…
  • it may be true that they didn’t see anything abnormal but they didn’t see anything abnormal because they didn’t get a good view of the tailbone in the first place!
  • So really then what becomes much more important is to get this side view or lateral view for people who have tailbone pain, because that will typically show a lot more detail.
  • Now beyond this there’s also having that lateral view done sitting versus standing which we can talk about in another in another video, because that’s really important as well, because there’s lots of times where people may look normal while they’re standing up but when they sit and put their body weight onto the tailbone (which is usually when they’re most painful) then they may have an abnormality or dislocation that only shows up on the sitting x-rays.
  • But that’s for another video.
  • So on this one just simple things first: frontal view can help with some things but really what’s most important for people with tailbone pain usually is that SIDE view or LATERAL view.
  • And I see this very very commonly: patients fly in to see me from around the country and sometimes internationally and there’s unfortunately lots and lots of times where people bring with them their CDs (which I appreciate) and we look at the imaging that were done that’s on the CDs of their x-rays, that they were told was were normal years ago when they first started having tailbone pain when the imaging were done.
  • And we realize there’s not a decent view of the tailbone to begin with.
  • And that can be very frustrating of course for patients.
  • So, anyway, I hope this information is helpful for you.
  • If you want more information you can find me online at www.TailboneDoctor.com.
  • Bye bye.
Here is the actual VIDEO:

Here is a screenshot photo from the video:
Tailbone X-rays, Side-View versus Front View, for Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain,

Tailbone X-rays, Side-View versus Front View, for Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain,

Sitting x-rays:
  • Note: This video, above, does not address the SITTING x-rays, which is even better. Most of local radiology centers will never have even heard of sitting-versus-standing x-rays, and will not be able to do those. But they should at least be able to do the front views and side views that I describe in this video above.
Tailbone Pain Book:

To get your copy of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!” click on this link: www.TailbonePainBook.com

Tailbone Pain Book cover Foye

Book: “Tailbone Pain Relief Now! Causes and Treatments for Your Sore or Injured Coccyx” by Patrick Foye, M.D.

Falls on Snow and Ice: Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain

Falls on Snow and Ice can Cause or Worsen Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain

In the video below, Dr. Patrick Foye (Director of the Coccyx Pain Center, Tailbone Pain Center) discusses how slips and falls on the snow and ice can cause or worsen tailbone pain.

Here is the text, and the video is below.
  • Hi. I’m Dr. Patrick Foye and I’m an M.D., or medical doctor, and I’m the Director of the Coccyx Pain Center (Tailbone Pain Center) here in New Jersey, online at www.TailboneDoctor.com
  • And I’m standing here in a bit of a snowstorm, not too much although it’s pretty cold, maybe in the 20s Fahrenheit [minus 6 Celsius].
  • I’m here to talk about one of the things that causes tailbone pain or flares it up for people that have tailbone pain is people who slip and fall on the snow and ice.
  • So I guess this is a bit of a public service announcement.
  • If you have tailbone pain or even if you don’t then you want to avoid having tailbone pain, you definitely want to do what you can to avoid slips and falls.
  • Things you can do:
    • make sure that you have good footwear that has good traction.
    • Go slowly.
    • Go cautiously.
    • And keep an eye out for snow and ice. [He says, while being pelted by snow and ice!]
  • I have had many many patients over the years who their tailbone pain was initially caused by a slip and fall on the snow and ice.
  • Or, they had tailbone pain and did very very well when they came for treatment here and then did well for years and then had a slip and fall and the tailbone pain came back as bad as it was before.
  • So, again, just to caution you to watch out for the snow and ice if you are someone who has had tailbone pain in the past.
  • Okay. Hang in there.
  • Stay warm.
  • And if you are looking for more information on tailbone pain you can find me online at www.TailboneDoctor.com.
  • Or if you’re looking for a copy of my book, the easiest place to find that is if you go to www.TailbonePainBook.com.
  • Okay. Thank you. Bye-bye now.
 Here is the video:

The snapshot below shows the moment in the video when Dr. Foye was pelted by a gusty wind of snow:
Falls on Snow Ice, Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain. Photo shows Dr. Foye pelted by wind and snow.

Falls on Snow and Ice can cause Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain. Photo shows Dr. Foye pelted by wind and snow while making the video. :-)

Tailbone Pain Book:

To get your copy of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!” click on this link: www.TailbonePainBook.com

Tailbone Pain Book cover Foye

Book: “Tailbone Pain Relief Now! Causes and Treatments for Your Sore or Injured Coccyx” by Patrick Foye, M.D.

 

Yellow Highlighter Cured Cancer?!? Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain.

Yellow Highlighter Cured Cancer?!? Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain.
  • The video is at the bottom of this page. Here is the text:
  • I’m going to tell you a story that’s crazy, but true, of how I used a yellow highlighter to cure cancer in my father-in-law and then I’ll tell you how it’s related to tailbone pain.
  • I’m Dr. Patrick Foye. I’m an M.D., or medical doctor, and I’m the Director of the Coccyx Pain Center or Tailbone Pain Center here in New Jersey.
  • About 20 years ago, shortly after I first got married, we got a phone call from my wife’s family in the Midwest, Chicago area, that my father-in-law, who was in the hospital in Chicago (he’s a former Notre Dame football player) and unfortunately they saw on his imaging studies what looked to be a cancer in his lungs.
  • And it was actually pretty clear that it looked pretty bad, pretty destructive.
  • It showed up incidentally on some imaging studies that he had done while he was at in the hospital for something unrelated.
  • And the plan was for him to have a biopsy where they would basically make a small surgical incision in the skin and they would go in and take a sample of tissue so that they could send it to the pathology to do slides to take a look and figure out exactly what type of cancer it was and all of that.
  • And he told them at the hospital, he said “well, you know, my son-in-law is a doctor.
  • He’s in new jersey and my and my daughter is there. Can you fax them a copy of the imaging results?” And the hospital did.
  • Now what I did when I got the imaging results was the exact same thing I pretty much always do when I get imaging results, which is I take a yellow highlighter and I highlight the important factors in the report.
  • It’s something I’ve been training medical students and residents.
  • It’s incredibly simple, right? It’s not rocket science.
  • And the very first thing that I typically always highlight is the patient name.
  • So I get the fax and I highlight the patient name.
  • But it’s not his name.
  • It wasn’t his imaging results.
  • And it turned out that somehow someone else’s report got mixed up into his chart.
  • And they were planning this whole diagnostic workup the family was sort in a in a whole kerfuffle worried that he had cancer when indeed he had no cancer at all.
  • It was somebody else’s report that happened to make it into his chart.
  • And apparently the medical team there hadn’t noticed and they thought it was his.
  • So they were consulting other doctors to do the biopsy and everything else.
  • And so that was basically a very very simple step of using a yellow highlighter to you could sort of say “cure” cancer.
  • At least in his case, that he was thought to have cancer and with one stroke of a yellow highlighter no longer had cancer when we called the team out there and got that all straightened out.
  • Now, how is this related to tailbone pain, which is what I treat?
  • I’m the Director of the Coccyx Pain Center (Tailbone Pain Center) here in new jersey, online at www.TailboneDoctor.com and it’s related to tailbone pain because patients come in to see me from all over the country and occasionally internationally.
  • And we typically tell them to bring with them any reports that they have from previous imaging studies that they’ve had of the tailbone, procedures they’ve had from surgeries or injections at the tailbone.
  • But even for patients who can’t make their way here to New Jersey to see me in person, my recommendation would be collect your medical records, your radiology reports from your x-rays your MRIs, your CT scans, bone scans, whatever studies you may have had done.
  • And take a simple yellow highlighter.
  • And what I recommend is that you highlight number one your name (to make sure that it’s actually your report), the date for when it was done, and highlight (if your main symptom is coccyx pain or tailbone pain) highlight the word coccyx or tailbone or coccygeal anytime that that appears in the report.
  • And I guarantee many of you will be shocked to find out that your x-ray report, or your MRI or CT report, never even includes the word coccyx or tailbone! That the radiologist never made any comment whatsoever on the appearance of your coccyx, the appearance of your tailbone, even though that was the presenting symptom the main reason that you went in for the evaluation in the first place.
  • I know that that probably sounds really crazy, but i see this practically every single day here at the coccyx pain center when patients come in and we look through their reports.
  • And they’re shocked to realize  they’ve had this pain going on for years and years, they had the imaging studies done years ago, they were told everything was normal and in fact the radiologist never actually looked at the tailbone at all.
  • And often the imaging studies never even included the tailbone at all! It was done of the lumbar spine.
  • So it’s a really really simple tip that often can pay big dividends because you can then go back to your doctor and say “hey, the imaging studies that were done for my tailbone did they even include the coccyx? The radiologist didn’t make any comment on it.
  • Or the physical exam notes from the physician never included documentation of a physical exam of the coccyx..
  • Or the procedure note shows that the procedure that was done was an injection at the lumbar epidural space or at the sacroiliac joint or a caudal epidural, none of which are an injection specifically at the coccyx.
  • So, again, many of you will be surprised what you can find out just by reviewing your medical records.
  • Collect your medical records.
  • Use a yellow highlighter.
  • Yellow is really good because if you need to make photocopies the yellow is light enough that you’re not going to obscure or blacken out the information that you want.
  • So don’t use a blue or orange highlighter. They’re not as good for those purposes.
  • There’s a there’s a whole chapter in my book which is Tailbone Pain Relief Now! I have an entire chapter in the back about collecting and have how to handle your medical records and navigate the healthcare system and some of the caveats or the hurdles that are in place for people with tailbone pain.
  • Because it’s often sort of this black box that physicians, radiologists, pain management doctors, musculoskeletal physicians, don’t pay attention to some of those details.
  • So, again, use the yellow highlighter because it can really it can really help you to see what was missed on your imaging studies.
  • Or perhaps the imaging studies are not yours at all!
  • Okay, again, I’m Dr. Patrick Foye.
  • Online you can find me at www.TailboneDoctor.com
  • Or if you’re interested in getting a copy of the book “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!” which is 272 pages all about the tailbone (diagnostic workup, treatment, etc.) that is available: on Amazon is probably the easiest way to find it if you just put in “TAILBONE” and the word “FOYE” (my last name) (spelled “F as in Frank,  O – Y – E”) you can find that there.
  • So anyway I hope that’s helpful for you.
  • Use your highlighter you’ll find it super helpful.
  • All right. Bye-bye.
Here is the VIDEO: 

 

Yellow Highlighter Cures Cancer, Coccyx Pain, Tailbone Pain

Yellow Highlighter Cures Cancer, Coccyx Pain, Tailbone Pain

Tailbone Pain Book:

To get your copy of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!” click on this link: www.TailbonePainBook.com

Tailbone Pain Book cover Foye

Book: “Tailbone Pain Relief Now! Causes and Treatments for Your Sore or Injured Coccyx” by Patrick Foye, M.D.

 

Coccyx Cushions for Tailbone Pain: Donut Cushions Versus Wedge Cushions

Wedge Cushions versus Donut Cushions for Coccyx Pain (Tailbone Pain)
  • I did a small research study evaluating whether patients with coccyx pain (tailbone pain) preferred wedge cushions versus donut cushions (doughnut cushions).
  • The abstract was published in 2009.
  • The results: Among patients with coccydynia who tried both types of cushions, many patients preferred neither. But patients with a preference were almost 5 times more likely to prefer wedge cushions as compared with donut cushions. 
 Abstract, as published:
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess which types of cushions are better at relieving tailbone pain for patients with coccydynia (coccyx pain). Specifically, the objective was to study these patients’ preferences comparing donut cushions (circular cushions with a hole in the center) versus wedge cushions (cushions with a triangular wedge shape cut out posteriorly to thus avoid coccygeal contact with the cushion).
  • DESIGN: A retrospective chart review.
  • RESULTS: At the time of the study, charts were available for 171 patients with coccydynia, all of whom had been evaluated by a single physiatrist at a university-based outpatient musculoskeletal/pain practice. Within the patients’ initial evaluation notes, there was documentation that 55 (32%) of these patients had tried using both coccyx wedge cushions and donut cushions, including 40 females and 15 males, with an average age of 49 years. Of these 55 patients who had tried both types of cushions, 19 patients (35%) preferred the wedge cushions, while only 4 patients (7%) prefer the donut cushions. 4 patients (7%) liked both types of cushions equally, while 23 patients (42%) preferred neither type of cushion.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with coccydynia who tried both types of cushions, many patients preferred neither. But patients with a preference were almost 5 times more likely to prefer wedge cushions as compared with donut cushions. This data may help guide patients and doctors regarding which cushions to try first.
Here is the abstract information, as published:
  • Journal: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
  • Publication date, page: 2009 Mar; 88 (3): S56
  • Authors: Patrick M. Foye, MD, Sean O. Sanderson, BA, and Jason A. Smith, BS
  • Author contact information: Patrick M. Foye, MD, Director, Coccyx Pain Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New Jersey Medical School, 90 Bergen St., DOC-3100, Newark, NJ 07103-2499. Phone: (973)972-2802. Fax: (973)972-2825. Http://www.TailboneDoctor.com
Photos of a Coccyx Wedge Cushion and a Coccyx Donut Cushion:
400_Tailbone_Wedge_Cushion,_for_coccyx_pain

Coccyx Wedge Cushion for Coccyx Pain (Tailbone Pain) 

 

400_Tailbone_Donut_Cushion,_Doughnut_for_coccyx_pain

Donut Cushion (Doughnut) for Coccyx Pain (Tailbone Pain)

To come to Dr. Foye’s Tailbone Pain Center:
Tailbone Pain Book:

To get your copy of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!” click on this link: www.TailbonePainBook.com

Tailbone Pain Book cover Foye

Book: “Tailbone Pain Relief Now! Causes and Treatments for Your Sore or Injured Coccyx” by Patrick Foye, M.D.

Tailbone Pain Center, Coccyx Pain Center, at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Map Showing the Tailbone Pain Center (Coccyx Pain Center), at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School
  • Just outside of New York City (NYC).
  • Just 10-15 minutes from Newark Liberty Airport.
Tailbone Pain Center, Coccyx Pain Center, USA, map

Tailbone Pain Center, Coccyx Pain Center, USA, map

 

Tailbone Pain Center, Eastern USA map, Coccyx Pain Center

Tailbone Pain Center, Eastern USA map, Coccyx Pain Center

 

To come for an evaluation, get more information at www.TailboneDoctor.com

Tailbone Pain Book:

To get your copy of Dr. Foye’s book, “Tailbone Pain Relief Now!” click on this link: www.TailbonePainBook.com

Tailbone Pain Book cover Foye

Book: “Tailbone Pain Relief Now! Causes and Treatments for Your Sore or Injured Coccyx” by Patrick Foye, M.D.

Book Now Available! Click on the book to get it now:


Get the Book at www.TailbonePainBook.com